Kaufman Music Center’s Special Music School - Old School Meets New Age Spirit In Forming The Musician of the 21st century

It’s that eventful time in anticipation of summer break and at the Kaufman Music Center’s Special Music School, kids conclude their school-year with some unique highlights. While some are busy preparing for their participation in the Kaufman Center International Youth Competition, the winners of the Special Music School’s High school Concerto Competition get to indulge in an exciting firsthand experience on stage: performing as soloists with an orchestra. Under the baton of David Bernard...
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Reed Tetzloff – worthy heir to the American spirit of pianism

Critics don’t easily assign adjectives like: “enthralls audiences with his magical tone,” (The Cincinnati Enquirer) and “ebullient virtuosity,” (Gramophone Magazine) unless marking a mature artist, concertizing for the better part of an established career. Such praise associated with the merely twenty-seven-year-old American pianist Reed Tetzloff from Minneapolis, Minnesota, is a telltale sign of how extraordinarily this young artist’s talent evolves within today’s classical piano presence, densely populated with numerous ascending protagonists of the art...
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The Attacca Quartet – dynamic imperative to dive into the next note

Far and between today’s copious landscapes of string quartets, the Attacca Quartet has distinguished itself for its captivating appearances and an aptitude for contemporary projects, yet equally high esteem for the traditional classical repertoire. Says founding member and cellist of the ensemble Andrew Yee: “When Amy and I formed the quartet with mutual Juilliard friends [in its original formation] in 2003, string quartets were becoming cool already, but there were not nearly as many...
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Osip Nikiforov – learning from the best to craft the art of piano playing

Not too long ago, renowned concert pianist Yefim Bronfman told me that “for time reasons, teaching, except for the occasional master class was not in his cards for the foreseeable future;” his busy international performance career just would not allow for a regular teaching schedule. But exceptions always confirm the rule: When the young Russian pianist Osip Nikiforov, was in the process of applying to Grad programs, this is what happened: “I went on...
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The inaugural Josef Gingold Chamber Music Festival of Miami

Like so many involved with the festival, the Cuban born violinist, Andrés Cárdenes, co-founder and artistic director of the Gingold Festival himself was a student of the iconic Josef Gingold, who left his inspirational imprint on many generations of high caliber musicians. “For his teaching, mentor-ship and humanity, Josef Gingold was the epitome of selfless dedication to the art, craft, discipline and legacy of string playing; that includes the solo, chamber music and orchestral...
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InsideOut Concerts - David Bernard commands orchestral and audiences’ engagement alike.

Rethinking classical concert etiquette and programs, bending genres, and creating publicity stunts to impact audiences’ musical experiences and appetite for classical concerts has been on most every concert producer’s mind for a while now. With the authority of his well-versed baton, as music director of the Park Avenue Chamber Symphony and the Massapequa Philharmonic, David Bernard employs an innovative approach at his InsideOut Concerts, calling for a large hall to accommodate placing the audience...
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Lars Vogt – All in for the big picture of music

On the morning of his sold-out Zankel Hall chamber recital with violinist Christian Tetzlaff and his sister, cellist Tanja Tetzlaff, pianist Lars Vogt opens Carnegie Hall’s backstage door for me. The trio’s artists hail from Germany and are Grammy-nominated musicians of the highest caliber. Vogt has a busy schedule before the evening concert, and I am in awe that he is making time for our meeting. (photo credit: Neda Navaee) We had corresponded beforehand...
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The new age thinking virtuoso – Nicolas Namoradze

Many of today’s pianists no longer identify exclusively with the romantic notion of the role of a performer as an inexplicable force of nature, providing a podium for the genial hinge of mysterious wonder. Such “virtuosity,” often applied dismissively and loaded with self-expressed emotional context, bears the risk of providing cover for ignorance in the interpretation of the exacting rationale and tactile process of mediating historic truths and accuracies within a composer’s work. In...
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Meeting, Greeting and Great Art

On Wednesday, April 17th, visitors at the Louis Meisel Gallery in Soho, celebrating Pianofest in the Hamptons, were treated to pianist Michael Brown’s deliciously delivered pianistic morsels with an ephemeral selection of even briefer pieces, written in episodic shorthand by Leonard Bernstein (from Anniversaries and West Side Story Suite) and Aaron Copland (El Salón México). Photo: GetClassical.org – Ilona Oltuski, selfie with narrator D.Terry Williams Surrounded by the collection of the gallery’s PhotoRealism, founder...
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In Review : Alex Weiser's "And All The Days Were Purple"

In his debut release And All The Days Were Purple, Alex Weiser couriers his dynamic approach in close proximity to the narrative arch of its underlying text, Yiddish and English poems by Anna Margolin, Edward Hirsch, Rachel Korn, and Abraham Sutzkever. A deeply personal quest submerges throughout queries within the framework of modern (American) culture and secular Jewish identity. Eliza Bagg’s strident voice leads through the song-cycle’s deft interspersing sound textures realized by Lee Dionne, piano,...
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